Merge 25 – Saturday – Tickets – Cat’s Cradle – Carrboro, NC – July 26th, 2014

Merge 25 - Saturday

Outdoor Party Hosted by Margaret Cho

Merge 25 - Saturday

Neutral Milk Hotel, Caribou, Teenage Fanclub, Bob Mould, Mikal Cronin, Ex Hex, The Love Language, Vertical Scratchers

Sat, July 26, 2014

Doors: 12:00 pm / Show: 1:00 pm (event ends at 10:00 pm)

Cat's Cradle

Carrboro, NC

$59.00 - $65.00

Facebook Event for Merge 25 - Saturday
Outdoor party hosted by Margaret Cho, Carrboro, NC - Neutral Milk Hotel, Caribou, Bob Mould, Ex Hex, The Love Language & more!
Tickets are non-refundable.
Children under the age of 10 are free when accompanied by an adult.
Outdoor show is rain or shine. Refunds will not be issued due to weather.
Ticket Limit - There is a 4 ticket limit for this event per household, customer, credit card number, phone number, or email address for this show. Patrons who exceed the ticket limit will have their order cancelled automatically and without notice.
Tickets must be used by the ticket purchaser and their guests - ID's will be checked prior to admittance.

Merge 25
Merge 25
Merge Records invites you to North Carolina to help us celebrate our 25th anniversary at Merge 25, a 4-day music festival that now includes Teenage Fanclub, Mount Moriah, William Tyler, Reigning Sound, David Kilgour & the Heavy 8s, Imperial Teen, Telekinesis, Eleanor Friedberger, Hiss Golden Messenger, Amor de Días, Saint Rich, The Music Tapes, Vertical Scratchers, Hospitality, and Mikal Cronin!

This set of performers rounds out the already-announced line-up of Wye Oak, The Clientele, Destroyer, Caribou, Lambchop (performing Nixon), Neutral Milk Hotel, The Rock*A*Teens, Ex Hex, Bob Mould, The Mountain Goats, Superchunk, and The Love Language.

We have plenty more surprises up our sleeves, so stay tuned as we celebrate Merge 25!

Wednesday, July 23, at Baldwin Auditorium, Durham, NC
$35 – tickets on sale April 22 through Duke Performances

Lambchop performs Nixon
Mount Moriah
William Tyler
Thursday, July 24, at Cat’s Cradle, Carrboro, NC
$49 – a few tickets still available through Cat’s Cradle

Superchunk
Reigning Sound
The Rock*A*Teens
The Clientele
Telekinesis
Eleanor Friedberger
Amor de Días
Hiss Golden Messenger
Friday, July 25, at Cat’s Cradle, Carrboro, NC
$49 – SOLD OUT

Destroyer
Wye Oak
The Mountain Goats
David Kilgour & the Heavy 8s
Imperial Teen
Hospitality
Saint Rich
Vertical Scratchers
Saturday, July 26, in Carrboro, NC (outdoor party)
$59 through June 1 / $65 thereafter

Neutral Milk Hotel
Caribou
Teenage Fanclub
Bob Mould
Mikal Cronin
Ex Hex
The Love Language
The Music Tapes
Neutral Milk Hotel
Neutral Milk Hotel
Featuring Jeff Mangum, Scott Spillane, Julian Koster, and Jeremy Barnes.

http://www.walkingwallofwords.com/
Caribou
Caribou
You reach a point in life where the question of how to stay at the top of your game looms, with the only real solution being: you change the game. Our Love, the new album from Caribou, is the sound of Dan Snaith doing just that. Our Love, due October 7 on Merge Records, is the fifth studio album from Caribou.

Our Love is formed around a mixture of digital pop production, hip hop-inspired beats, muted house basslines, and a love of shuffling garage that can be traced all the way back to the time of Start Breaking My Heart – all of which are, of course, filtered through Dan’s own unique perspective. The warm analog sounds of classic soul should not be overlooked either, for they weave themselves most intensely into the record’s DNA. In fact, Our Love is probably Caribou’s most soulful record to date, with tracks like “Back Home” whose heartfelt lyrics – dealing in tired relationships and a weary kind of love – and organic nature cut through the bubbling synths and blissful euphoria of their synthetic constructions. It’s not all downbeat of course; while some thoughts linger on mortality, loss, and letting go, there is always an element of celebration.

Having followed up his Polaris Prize-winning 2007 record Andorra with the universally adored Swim in 2010 (selling nearly 175,000 copies worldwide and being named Album of the Year by Rough Trade, Mixmag, and Resident Advisor while also hitting The Guardian, Pitchfork, Spin, and Mojo’s Top 20), Dan has spent the intervening four years touring the world, bringing not only the sounds of Caribou to the stage but proving his immeasurable worth as a DJ with epic 7½-hour-long sets. In 2012, Caribou were personally invited to join Radiohead on the road while Dan released his first album under the guise of his dancefloor-loving pseudonym Daphni to widespread critical acclaim. Following the shape-shifting sounds of JIAOLONG and the brightly textured, fluid constructions of Swim – both inward-looking records in their own way – Dan withdrew to the basement once more to work on Caribou’s next opus. Only he didn’t: Our Loveisn’t the sound of isolated creation but the sound of Dan at his most connected – with love for his listeners, his collaborators, and those closest to him.
Teenage Fanclub
Teenage Fanclub
Teenage Fanclub are a Scottish alternative rock band from near Glasgow, formed in 1989.They emerged initially from Glasgow's C86 scene, a casette compilation by music magazine NME in 1986.

Their sound relies heavily on chiming, Byrds-esque guitars and harmony vocals.In concert, they usually alternate between the three songwriters (who all sing lead vocals on their own songs) giving equal playing time to each one's songs.

There have been a succession of drummers, including Francis MacDonald, Brendan O'Hare and Paul Quinn, who was later replaced by the returning Francis MacDonald. Keyboardist Finlay MacDonald (no relation) has also been a member.

In 2006, the band held two special concerts (in London and Glasgow) playing their 1991 album Bandwagonesque in its entirety.

Their most recent album, Man-Made, was released on May 2, 2005, on the band's own PeMa label. Man-Made was recorded in Chicago in 2004, and produced by John McEntire of Tortoise.

Liam Gallagher of Britpop giants Oasis called the band "the second best band in the world" — second, of course, only to his own outfit.

Teenage Fancub will begin to record their next album, their ninth, at studios in Norfolk at the end of August, 2008.
Bob Mould
Bob Mould
Those familiar with the decades-spanning oeuvre of Bob Mould—from his pioneering early ’80s work with Hüsker Dü to his solo work in singer-songwriter, electronic, and rock modes, to the deafening pop sparkle of Sugar—might expect a new album bearing the title Silver Age to be a somber and reflective set in the mode of his last album, 2009’s Life and Times…and they’d be way off the mark.

Silver Age is an intense and concise ten song blast far more reminiscent of Bob’s latter-
day Hüsker Dü output—first marked by the monumental sprawl of 1984’s Zen Arcade which then gave way to the short, sharp pop focus of 1985’s New Day Rising—and his early ’90s tenure with Sugar, whose classic debut Copper Blue marks its 20th anniversary this year. That said, Silver Age is no nostalgia trip. Aside from lyrical content that shows Bob as in-the-now as ever, Silver Age came together quickly and organically in the wake of a series of electric solo dates in 2011 supporting Foo Fighters (where he guested each night on “Dear Rosemary,” the track from the Foos’ Wasting Light on which Bob shares writing and vocal duties) as well as a solo acoustic/book tour around last summer’s publication of See a Little Light: The Trail of Rage and Melody, the autobiography Bob co-authored with Michael Azerrad (Come as You Are, Our Band Could Be Your Life). These events culminated in a tribute last November at Los Angeles’ Disney Hall that featured the likes of Dave Grohl, Ryan Adams, Spoon’s Britt Daniel, and Craig Finn and Tad Kubler of The Hold Steady celebrating the width and breadth of Bob’s body of work.

“I’d been batting around the idea of another aggressive pop record for some time,” Bob says, “especially as the 20th anniversary of Copper Blue kept getting closer. But it was really the shows with Foo Fighters that got me thinking when I started writing for this record: Did I just write a Sugar song? Or a Foo Fighters song? Or one of my own songs? And does it really matter? Once I got that out of the way, it freed me up to have some fun and set about making a simple rock record.”

It’s no surprise, then, that Silver Age careens out of the speakers with a sense of exhilaration that reflects the excitement with which Bob and his live band of bassist Jason Narducy (Spl:t S:ngle, Verbow) and drummer Jon Wurster (Superchunk, the Mountain Goats) cranked out the record in a tight whirlwind of a window from in early 2012. But that’s not to say that Silver
Age is a lighthearted romp—as ever, there’s plenty of dark matter at the center of these sweet melodic nuggets. First single “The Descent,” for example, is one of those perfect moments that lands firmly in the Mould wheelhouse, with walls of luminescent guitars, phantom choruses, and infectious hooks all leading toward the concluding refrain of “My world, it is descending.” The opening one-two of “Star Machine” and “Silver Age,” on the other hand, pairs abrasive riffs with equally harsh meditations on fame, immaturity, and the lessons and consequences thereof. Other Silver Age highlights include the bittersweet romantic epic “Round the City Square” (“It feels like people always look to my songs to help define their own failed
relationships,” Bob laughs); the upbeat and earnest celebration of “First Time Joy”; and the unabashedly literal “Keep Believing,” a rousing love letter to the records that shaped Bob’s personal and professional life. Listen closely and see how many of the references you can pinpoint:

Bring me thoughts and words, pass me the revolver I can see for miles, and everything’s in color
Rock and roll all night until I feel the thunder
I got a handle on some complicated fun

We’re all sniffing glue, pleasures so unknown
A circle drawn in blue, the murmur baritone
Picnic on a Pedro lawn, heaven took that monkey song
Never mind the battle won, could you be the loveless one?

“I don’t know if there’s an arc to this record,” Bob says. “But if I had to boil it down to one core idea, it would be: I love music. I love my life. I love what I do for a living. It’s right there on the lyric sheet; it references itself, really. More than any other record I’ve made, this one gives a real glimpse into how much making music means to me as a means of expression, as well as what music means to me as a fan.”

And so has it always been the case for Bob Mould, the music he’s created defining every phase of his life, both cataloging memories and propelling him ever forward: Hüsker Dü’s formation in 1979 and the hardcore anthems, tight, melodic, hard-pop chestnuts, and sprawling double-vinyl conceptual opuses it churned out in equal measure up to its dramatic 1987 flameout; Bob’s solo works ranging from his landmark 1989 debut Workbook to Black Sheets of Rain (1990), Body of Song (2005), District Line (2008), and Life and Times (2009); his forays into electronic music, including 2002’s Modulate and his Blowoff collaboration with Richard Morel; and of course, the soon-to-be-reissued body of work that Sugar packed into its brief existence, featuring the 1992 debut Copper Blue which Bob and his band have been playing front to back at recent live shows. It seems to be Bob’s summations and reflections on these major creative periods of his life and career that open up new wellsprings while coming to terms with the old works—a natural process that has produced winning results yet again in the form of Silver Age.

“It’s no coincidence that this record came at this point,” Bob says. “In 1991, closing the door on a run of all-acoustic shows led right into the beginning of Sugar and Copper Blue. So you could state a case that the solo shows accompanying the book readings through 2011—plus the Disney Hall show and knowing the 20th anniversary of Copper Blue was right around the corner—wrapping that all up led me right into Silver Age. I’m well aware that there’s no way to get into a time machine and go back to being the person I was 20 years ago, but it is nice to get three musicians in the studio together and get back inside that three-minute pop song structure again.”
Mikal Cronin
Mikal Cronin
Mikal Cronin's self-titled debut from 2011 was all about endings: the end of college, the end of a serious relationship, and the end of his time in Los Angeles, where he grew up. So it's no surprise that his sophomore release MCII—and first disc for Merge Records—is all about new beginnings.

"Since the first record came out, my life has changed quite a bit," Cronin says, referencing his move to San Francisco and tours with Ty Segall as well as with his own band. "I was presented with a whole new slew of problems and situations that I was trying to work through." "Am I Wrong" and "Shout It Out" dissect his fears over a new relationship, while "I'm Done Running from You" and "Weight" find him freaking out about what it means to grow up in the 21st century.

Other than these few exceptions, Cronin played all of the instruments. "It all makes total sense to me, but when I step back, it sounds kind of schizophrenic," Cronin says. "Hopefully it all sounds enough like me to make sense."
Ex Hex
Ex Hex
Ex Hex is what your older brother’s friends listened to. “Roxy Roller” and “Virginia Plain” rumbling from the Kenwood in the basement.
It’s what your babysitters listened to, and it’s what stuck with me.
Ex Hex is a power trio: guitar, drums, and bass.
We are thrilled to have found a home at Merge.
Ex Hex will release their debut album in 2014, and a tour is in the works including the SXSW Festival in March.
The Love Language
The Love Language
Friends and fans of The Love Language songwriter and frontman Stuart McLamb have learned to expect a lot, but rarely in a timely manner. Completing a triumvirate of spiritual transmissions spent lost (2009’s The Love Language) and found (2010’s Libraries), 2013’s Ruby Red exorcises the transient brilliance fostered by McLamb within the sheetrock walls of the album’s namesake artist space.

Featuring over twenty musicians and straddling several time zones, The Love Language’s lone puppeteer borrowed heavier equipment, and held on to it longer. Initiated in a windowless unit at the fabled Ruby Red, several failed attempts and false starts at a songwriting spree landed McLamb and his engineer/case worker/boxing coach BJ Burton in Black Mountain, North Carolina, consuming every square inch of a carpeted bungalow located a few acres too close to their skittish neighbors. Soon after, Burton’s relocation to Minneapolis effectively thrust McLamb from their shared nest, helping Ruby Red discover its inherent propensity for flight.
Ruby Red produces new standards for the Carolina pop songbook, finding The Love Language as an extroverted community art project made by responsible citizens of a loosely packed scene who know that McLamb will match whatever they contribute. The heartbreak is over. Now we’re getting somewhere.
Vertical Scratchers
Vertical Scratchers
Vertical Scratchers is John Schmersal (ex- Brainiac/Enon, live Caribou & Crooks on Tape) and Christian Beaulieu (ex-Triclops!/Anywhere). Their debut album Daughter of Everything will be released on February 25, 2014.

One of the most persistent elements you will hear throughout the record is the percussive nature in which the guitars were played and recorded. Guitar playing is vertical scratching, and in this band, the guitar strums are almost louder than the amps. John explains, "Part of the aesthetic we we're establishing when writing Vertical Scratchers songs was to maintain a sense of urgency and raw energy without relying on volume and distortion. I wanted the guitars to sound light and jangle-y and most songs were purposefully sang in a soft falsetto.

Simplicity was the inspiration. Get in the van. Rehearse in the van. Tour in the van. Stay mobile. "I have played in a lot of bands with complicated set ups and implemented technologies," says John. "I also do a lot of recording and editing on computers of music/audio. So, part of the longing for simplicity was about streamlining the ideas to be as organic and real time as possible." This impulse to keep things moving is reflected in the songs themselves. Most Vertical Scratchers' songs clock in under the 2 minute mark but, often going in twice as many directions as your average length song. Pop Deception. Think the Kinks with a Buzzcocks brevity.

"The most complicated aspect of the songs are the structures themselves but, only if you tried to learn how to play them. The details are supposed to SOUND easy," continues John. We wanted to strip things down to the bare bones for aesthetics and presentation. Christian and I liked the idea of being able to show up anywhere with next to nothing, jump onto a stage that had whatever drums and guitar set up and be able to play these songs. (not that we plan on showing up everywhere with absolutely nothing) But, the principle is possible.

Daughter of Everything was recorded live in Los Angeles at The Smell in September of 2012. The special guest appearance on lead vocals from Robert Pollard was recorded at Waterloo Sound in Ohio by Todd Tobias.
Venue Information:
Cat's Cradle
300 East Main St.
Carrboro, NC, 27510
http://catscradle.com/