Carrboro Block Party with Lost In The Trees, The Love Language, and Loamlands – Tickets – Cat’s Cradle Parking Lot – Carrboro, NC – May 5th, 2013

Carrboro Block Party with Lost In The Trees, The Love Language, and Loamlands

Cat's Cradle Presents...

Carrboro Block Party with Lost In The Trees, The Love Language, and Loamlands

Steph Stewart, The Jackets*

Sun, May 5, 2013

4:00 pm

Cat's Cradle Parking Lot

Carrboro, NC

$0.00

Free Show/Voucher Required. No coolers/backpacks/lawn chairs/containers.

A limited number of vouchers may become available between now and Sunday. Please check the ticketing link for availability. A small number will also be released at the gate on the day of the show. We want to allow entry to as many as we can, so know we are doing all we can to accommodate!

Playing on the ReverbNation stage
Steph Stewart and the Boyfriends
The Jackets

*These bands were selected to play on the ReverbNation Stage from over 800 applicants on ReverbNation!

Lost In The Trees
Lost In The Trees
When Lost In The Trees set out to record Past Life, their third album for ANTI-, they knew they needed a break with the past. Frontman Ari Picker looked to move beyond the themes of loss that fueled two emotional, densely personal collections of songs. Channeling the liberating happiness he felt in his young marriage into his method, he came up with a new approach to writing: "I wanted to reach out and grab the music rather than have it come from some internal place." On past releases Picker had used an expanded six-member band to render his carefully composed, classical-inflected songs, bringing them fully arranged to the studio for the band to perform. For the new album, the band was pared to a lean electronic-rock four-piece, and in this new configuration Lost In The Trees took to the road to workshop the songs that would become Past Life. Immediately, the new tracks evidence more than a band pared down; the arrangements are modern, spare, minimal, emphasizing groove and rhythm, blending the sonic architecture of 21st century electronic dance music, the austere emotion of the minimalist composers, and the sensual swerve of post-Bowie 80s pop.

Having crafted the songs to create a maximum impact in a live setting, the band made their next break with past practice, electing to work with an outside producer for the first time. Nicolas Vernhes, whose credits include breakthrough albums from Deerhunter, Dirty Projectors, Animal Collective, and Wild Nothing, endorsed the band's new minimal aesthetic, and the question in the studio became, "How much can we strip away" With an approach that forefronts beats and basslines, Vernhes and the band lift away the orchestral density of the previous albums – the emotional analog of Picker's intense lyrics – leaving a more direct framework of soul-inflected guitar lines, throbbing groove, and Picker's soaring vocal hooks.

Fans that came to the band lured by the lush classicism of All Alone In An Empty House and A Church That Fits Our Needs (the Wall Street Journal's album of the year in 2012) will not be disappointed. After all, the band are known for their unique orchestral sound, and Church, with its intense narrative of loss, drew lavish praise from all quarters, both as an "exquisite exercise in the seduction of melancholy" (Iowa Press-Citizen) and "a stirring blend of modest rusticity and urbane ambition" (New York Times). The haunting lyricism of Picker's voice and melodies has not diminished in the new sparer approach, but instead rises to the fore, bringing out that timeless quality of the melodies that is the common ground of both folk and pop music. This pop quality, buried but always present in previous efforts, shines on Past Life; not pop in any trivial, retro sense, but the yearning lilt of Harry Nilsson or Mark Hollis, that floating melodicism that Relix found so "achingly beautiful."

Picker, for one, is pleased to be moving on from the highly personal lyrics of the previous albums to more universal themes. He singles out "Glass Harp" from the new album, describing it as "a half awake song to my wife," adding that it may be "as much of a love song as I can write." On "Daunting Friend" Picker promises his companion "we'll float around the town," a cinematic image that recalls the romantic mysticism of Wings of Desire more than it does any past Lost In The Trees lyric. This new openness in Picker's imagist lyrics – loose, joyful, embracing – tends on Past Life toward meditations on what Picker describes as "recognizing impermanence," all rendered by Lost In The Trees' greatest instrument (perhaps overshadowed in the past by the violins and harps): Picker's profound tenor voice. The voice the New York Times called the "essential embodiment of vulnerability" becomes on Past Life the load-bearing wall – it's a burden this extraordinary instrument, and Picker, are more than ready to take on.
The Love Language
The Love Language
Friends and fans of The Love Language songwriter and frontman Stuart McLamb have learned to expect a lot, but rarely in a timely manner. Completing a triumvirate of spiritual transmissions spent lost (2009’s The Love Language) and found (2010’s Libraries), 2013’s Ruby Red exorcises the transient brilliance fostered by McLamb within the sheetrock walls of the album’s namesake artist space.

Featuring over twenty musicians and straddling several time zones, The Love Language’s lone puppeteer borrowed heavier equipment, and held on to it longer. Initiated in a windowless unit at the fabled Ruby Red, several failed attempts and false starts at a songwriting spree landed McLamb and his engineer/case worker/boxing coach BJ Burton in Black Mountain, North Carolina, consuming every square inch of a carpeted bungalow located a few acres too close to their skittish neighbors. Soon after, Burton’s relocation to Minneapolis effectively thrust McLamb from their shared nest, helping Ruby Red discover its inherent propensity for flight.
Ruby Red produces new standards for the Carolina pop songbook, finding The Love Language as an extroverted community art project made by responsible citizens of a loosely packed scene who know that McLamb will match whatever they contribute. The heartbreak is over. Now we’re getting somewhere.
Loamlands
Loamlands
Durham, North Carolina’s Loamlands have announced their debut release, Some Kind Of Light, an EP of stirring Americana and Southern rock tunes penned by Kym Register and Will Hackney. The duo have collaborated for years, and the newly formed Loamlands provides a platform for each musician to express contemporary ideas through an array of Southern musical styles. Lead vocalist Kym Register delivers powerful tales of perseverance, justice and uncertainty, frequently blurring the lines between the personal and the political. Recorded in 3 days in rural North Carolina with members of Megafaun and Lost in the Trees serving as rhythm section, Some Kind Of Light is an essential introduction to one of North Carolina’s most exciting new bands.
Steph Stewart
Steph Stewart
Steph Stewart is haunting, post-Appalachain lull married to sweet and smoky honky-tonk. Her ethereal twang feeds an audience, easing into the gut like honey, accented by hoppy mandolin picking and bright fiddle melodies. Her boyfriends include Omar Ruiz-Lopez (fiddle, faddle, mandolin), Mario Arnez (lead guitar, backing vocals), Nicholas Vandenberg (upright bass, backing vocals). Together, Steph and her boyfriends deliver a haunting sound both unique and strangely familiar, fusing old Appalachia and top-shelf Americana.

Rooted in memories of climbing trees and dancing to Johnny Cash with her grandfather as a kid in North Carolina, Steph writes about place and the transient idea that is home. Personalities reflect her inspiration: the plight of a coal miner, the defiance of a cross-dressing, Victorian cowgirl, the scorned lover. Other songs—the more tragic, emotional ones—unleash a piercing moan that hits harder, like a cast iron pan dropped on the kitchen floor, throttling with a resounding pulse long after the music is over.

This summer Steph toured throughout North Carolina and Tennessee, appearing on Knoxville’s Blue Plate Special and closing down the 2012 Eno River Fesival along the way. They have opened the stage with Grammy-nominated artist David Mayfield and played to a packed out lawn for over 1500 people at the NC Museum of Art as a musical guest for the Paperhand Puppet Intervention. Most recently, Steph was a finalist in Our State Magazine‘s songwriting competition for her latest single, “Wake Me Carolina” which was judged by some of the state’s best talent including Laurelyn Dossett, Rhiannon Giddens (Carolina Chocolate Drops) and Dave Wilson (Chatham County Line) among others.

Steph debuted her self-released 5-track EP in 2011 and looks forward to producing a full-length LP.
The Jackets*
The Jackets*
If you are familiar with the NC triangle’s music scene over the last 10 years then you are familiar with ‘The Jackets’. Though the band’s name and music are new to the scene, the members are not. Half of the four-piece rock outfit is of international bluegrass fame via Chatham County Line while the others are well traveled in other successful triangle and national acts.

The Jackets sound is a bit tough to categorize, but if it has to be labeled then that label is rock n‘ roll. Driven by high-powered electric guitar melodies and lofty vocal harmonies, these four musicians produce a sound that is reminiscent of eras gone by, while simultaneously avoiding the pitfalls of nostalgia.
Venue Information:
Cat's Cradle Parking Lot
300 E. Main St. Parking Lot
Carrboro, NC, 27510
http://catscradle.com/