Waka Flocka Flame – Tickets – Cat’s Cradle – Carrboro, NC – January 14th, 2017

Waka Flocka Flame

Waka Flocka Flame

Well$

Sat, January 14, 2017

Doors: 8:00 pm / Show: 9:00 pm

Cat's Cradle

Carrboro, NC

$22.00 - $25.00

Waka Flocka Flame
Waka Flocka Flame
Waka Flocka Flame doesn't give a fuck about what you think. The riotous rapper, who penned hits like "O Let's Do It" and "No Hands," has undergone an artistic transformation since his 2010 bombastic debut "Flockaveli." He's experimented with his sound but always with the focus on growing as a rapper.

The Queens-bred, Atlanta-based MC is always thinking outside of the box on wax. When you hear Waka's scratchy voice over electro beats by Neon Dreams or Steve Aoki, it's his way of showing that trap music isn't his only trick. "I'm trying to open people's brains up," Waka says. "You don't have to be stuck in a fucking bubble. You don't have to do this kind of music because people say you are this kind of artist. I do electronic music just to get out the bubble."

Born Juaquin James Malphurs, the 28-year-old rapper rose to prominence as Gucci Mane's protégé and his flagship artist of 1017 Brick Squad. In 2009, Waka put trap back on the map, dropping the first volume of his street classic "Salute Me or Shoot Me" that caught fire with songs, "We On The Way, "Dreads N Gold" and his breakout single "O Let's Do it." The mixtape's buzz allowed Waka to release his proper debut "Flockaveli" in October, which peaked at No. 2 on the Billboard 100. Here, Waka's authenticity was a major selling point. None of Waka's stories about his struggle were fabricated. "When I was making 'Flockaveli,' I just didn't give a fuck," he says. "I didn't give a fuck about the awards. I didn't give a fuck about how people felt. I just didn't give a fuck 'cause I didn't know. I never knew the outcome of these words."

Together with Southside and Lex Luger's thunderous production, Waka helped revive street raps and his sound began to blow up. Following his sudden popularity, hip-hop's mainstream elite like T.I., Drake and B.o.B wanted to collaborate with him while he spread his influence to a host of new rappers like Wooh Da Kid and Frenchie. On Waka and Gucci's 2011 collaborative effort "Ferrari Boyz" and 2012's "Triple F Life: Fans, Friends & Family," Waka's high energy is the sole reason why he's earned the nickname "Turn Up God." That style translates into the EDM world Waka calls home now, where he fell in the love with the genre during a tour in Europe two years ago. "Music is like anger management," he says. "It's fun. You get to express yourself."

On June 1, Waka Flocka is ready to express a new musical direction in his Atlantic Records debut "Flockaveli II." Set to feature production from Southside, Rico Love, Jim Jonsin, and more, Waka wants this album to return to the basics that made him a rap star. For "Flockaveli II," he's approaching his third studio album the same way as his previous projects: trap banger after trap banger. His laid-back demeanor makes him a fan favorite, and he's hoping that his straightforward creative process will please his core fans. "I'm cocky when it comes to my fans and my music 'cause I know my fans talk to me," he says, noting that 31 tracks are already laid down for the LP. "I want my fans to look at they haters like, 'Told y'all my boy was gonna go hard. Fuck y'all.' I want my fans to hear 'Flockaveli II,' and I want them to put a dread wig on and shake their head and rock with me."

While Waka Flocka has flooded the streets with mixtapes, including March's recent release, "The Turn Up Godz Tour," he doesn't want to place high expectations on "Flockaveli II." But, it holds a lot of sentimental value because the LP is also releasing on the birthday of his late brother Kayo Redd. Kayo was a firm supporter of Waka's music from the beginning, encouraging him to always put out his music to satisfy his fans. "That's like a birthday gift to my brother 'cause he's a diehard," he says.

With 1.3 million followers on Twitter (@WakaFlockaBSM) and a million followers on Instagram, he's become the second most active celebrity on social media platforms, as well as the second most searched name on Google. Waka Flocka Flame is also cultivating a steady EDM presence thanks to touring with Steve Aoki and appearing on songs by DJ-producer Borgore and Flosstradamus. While fans have to wait for his EDM album "Turn Up God" releasing sometime this year, they can anticipate that "Flockaveli II" will have his no-fucks-given attitude on full display.

"'Flockaveli II' is for the streets. It's for the people," Waka says. "'Flockaveli II' is just the savior of the party."
Well$
Well$
Like most kids in his native town of Charlotte, North Carolina, Leroy Shingu, had a head filled with Hip-hop dreams growing up, even trying his hand at freestyling when he was all of nine years old.
But a storied background starkly different to the blissful suburban reality of his peers would compel the rapper better known as Well$ to turn that childhood fantasy into his newly launched career as a rapper.

Quietly released in 2012, $ay La V, Well$' debut EP rose steadily on the Bandcamp charts to peak at number 5 and eventually become the most downloaded album in the Charlotte Area. That remarkable ascent as well as the video for the song State of Ecstasy The Interlude Part 1 hauled Well$ out of virtual anonymity, and shoved him onto high profile stage performances with artists such as G Eazy, Chris Webby, Johnny Polygon, and one of his idols Pac Div.

Proud To Be An American, one of Well$' standout tracks off $ay La V, is the assured declaration of a young man who has come to terms with his identity and adopted home, flaws and all. Yet it wasn't always this way. Born in the US to Congolese illegal immigrants, Well$ has encountered the ins and outs of America's legal system for as long as he can remember. What started as a routine police search ended up with his mother serving a six-month jail stint when it emerged that she was in the country undocumented. Left mostly in the care of a grandmother who barely speaks English, Well$' teenage life slowly spiraled downwards into delinquency. Dabbling in car theft, drug dealing and eventually dropping out of high school caused his concerned mother to ship him off to New Orleans to stay with his cousin Alec Lomami in the hope that he could steer him back on to the straight and narrow.
Lomami (nowadays producer and Immaculate Records label owner) averted Well$' focus to music as a means to channel his feelings of angst and isolation. In 2010 the two of them began work in earnest on Well$' debut, marking the turning point for him.

As always, on his forth-coming album Well$' music deftly walks the tricky balance between niche underground and commercial mainstream drawing on styles that range from breast-beating braggadocio through to quiet, moody introspection. "My music is like me, sometimes it's serious, sometimes it's playful, sometimes it's happy, sometimes it's sad, sometimes it's meaningful and sometimes it's meaningless," Well$ describes his swinging pendulum of musical expressions, always true to his realest self.
Fatherhood is one of many subjects that Well$ touches on, himself newly a father to a three-year-old. The lead single Black Swan explores the life choices of a young woman affected by an absent father. Elsewhere, on Major Pain Well$ walks in the shoes if his own imperfect dad.
In Dreams of an Insomniac, Well$ stands on the edge of a cliff and meticulously lays out fears of flying – those pesky "what if" questions that keep him up at night.

That rare and commendable honesty Well$ displays comes from his admiration of now era rap stars. "Kid Cudi, Wiz Khalifa's tape Kush & Orange Juice, Pac Div, Drake.
Venue Information:
Cat's Cradle
300 East Main St.
Carrboro, NC, 27510
http://catscradle.com/