Yonder Mountain String Band – Tickets – Cat’s Cradle – Carrboro, NC – January 26th, 2017

Yonder Mountain String Band

Yonder Mountain String Band

The Railsplitters

Thu, January 26, 2017

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

Cat's Cradle

Carrboro, NC

$27.50 - $30.00

Yonder Mountain String Band
Yonder Mountain String Band
For nearly 17 years, Yonder Mountain String Band has redefined bluegrass music, expanding the traditional acoustic genre beyond its previously established boundaries by steadily pushing the envelope into the realms of rock n' roll and improvisation. YMSB has always played music of their own design, in the process attracting a devout coterie of fans that often resembles a tight knit family on an epic musical journey as Yonder traverses the country with an ever-rigorous tour schedule. Yonder is a quintessential ensemble honing its craft night after night on the road, and the fans are there to experience it in real time. The result is music that doesn't stand still, it's always progressing and breaking unprecedented ground.

With their latest album, Black Sheep (scheduled for national release on their own Frog Pad Records at Telluride Bluegrass Festival on June 16, 2015), Yonder Mountain String Band — Adam Aijala (guitar, vocals), Dave Johnston (banjo, vocals), Ben Kaufmann (bass, vocals), Allie Kral (violin, vocals), and Jacob Jolliff (mandolin, vocals) — begins a new era. The first YMSB release produced by the band itself, Black Sheep is, by any measure, a triumph, perhaps the most mesmeric of their career. The result, says Kaufmann, is that, "This record sounds more like Yonder than any record we've ever done. I'm hoping that when people are finished listening to it, they'll just hit play and listen to it again."

Black Sheep marks the first time in Yonder's history that they're actually utilizing, throughout an entire record, the conventional five-piece instrumental arsenal of bluegrass introduced in the 1940s: guitar, mandolin, banjo, fiddle and bass. With the exception of the album's sole cover tune, "Ever Fallen In Love," originally by the late '70s British punk-rock band the Buzzcocks, each of the album's new tracks were written by the YMSB members during the past couple of years. Three of the new songs — "Annalee," "Landfall" and the title track — have already been road-tested on tour; others will be added to the band's live repertoire following the album's release. The majority of Black Sheep was recorded at Coupe Studios in Boulder, Colorado, with Adam handling much of the engineering at his home studio and while on the road; the first time a band member has taken on that task.

Even on first listen, it becomes instantaneously apparent that Black Sheep is the work of a new Yonder Mountain String Band, one with a strong commitment to re-exhibiting itself and broadening its parameters following the departure of a founding member. While it's immediately recognizable as YMSB music, there's undeniably a raw aesthetic to the studio tracks — a sense of daring is embedded in both the instrumental interaction between these five singular players and in the lyrical content of each song.

Yonder has its roots in the year 1998, when the original quartet came together in Colorado. Through steadfast gigging in all manner of venues from small clubs to massive outdoor festivals, Yonder Mountain String Band quickly built a robust fanbase while continually experimenting to define its sound. Some of the most fervent audiences were at jam band shows and festivals, where fans took readily to YMSB's potent mix of the traditional bluegrass of Bill Monroe, the Stanley Brothers and Doc Watson and the improvisational sensibilities of the Grateful Dead and Phish. Also deeply ingrained in the band, albeit more subtly, was a fierce love for punk, which provided the members with seminal influences while they were growing up. "We didn't even hear bluegrass until our 20s," says Aijala. "Falling in love with the sound of bluegrass instruments, while also having all of these outside influences that had nothing to do with bluegrass — well, what comes out isn't what we envisioned."

With the band's 17th anniversary coming this summer, and an extensive tour schedule running throughout the year, a revitalized Yonder Mountain takes delight in the fact that they are still reaching new fans while simultaneously retaining the characteristics that brought their greater community together in the first place. The loss of one member and the subsequent invitation for some of today's top pickers to help shape their evolving sound brings intriguing opportunities to the table; ones that set YMSB on its new path. Black Sheep is a bold statement, meant to passionately get fans up on their feet and ecstatically dancing, but it's also about embracing the moment. Essential changes are a healthy step in keeping the music alive and well.

"We've been growing over the years and I feel like we really don't have any limitations," says Aijala. "It doesn't feel like work when you get to hang out with people that you care about and play music."

Adds Kaufmann, "It's not just bluegrass — it's progressive. Everything Yonder has ever tried to do, we're doing in this record. It's gonna take some time for fans to get acquainted with the new Yonder. When you make a big change like we did, it's a huge thing. But the band is a force, and the album is such a perfect example of our new direction."

Says Johnston in conclusion, "Yonder Mountain String Band is as durable as bluegrass itself. It changes and morphs and has an open-endedness that makes anything possible."
The Railsplitters
The Railsplitters
Fresh off the success of their first album, and taking first place in Rockygrass' Best New Band Competition, Colorado natives, The Railsplitters got busy touring the US, meeting wider audiences, and of course, spending hours in the tour van! As you can imagine from five members traveling across the United States, the musical array pouring out of the van onto the open highway was wildly eclectic, crossing over genre and time. From boundary breaking trip hop and electronica groups like Gorillaz and Thievery Corporation, to more direct influences like The Infamous Stringdusters and Lake Street Dive, the musical potpourri heard in their time on the road eventually began to seep into the band's own music. With their new album, The Faster It Goes, they're using these new sounds to break the bonds of bluegrass and unleash tradition. Lauren Stovall and the rest of the 'Splitters suggest that using your roots to evolve is really at the heart of the genre, not unlike Bill Monroe, who himself was an innovator. With their finger on the pulse, The Railsplitters are pushing the genre forward with an adventurous spirit, carrying in the tradition of breaking boundaries with their innovative sound.

The Railsplitters' secret weapon is two-fold: first, the innovative imagination of banjo player Dusty Rider's songwriting, who writes with the full band in mind, imagining an entire song in his head before it's even heard it out loud. Second, the powerfully distinct vocals of Lauren Stovall whose voice is as clean as Emmylou, as cutting as Allison Krauss, and carrying some of the attitude of Dolly herself. Lauren's vocal lines fill The Railsplitters' sound with something distinct and undeniable. In addition, part of The Railsplitters' new color is brought on by the band's newest member, Joe D'Esposito, whose New England-influenced fiddling adds new directions to the band's sound. With masterfully executed mandolin and banjo by Peter Sharpe and Dusty Rider, and well supported by upright bassist Leslie Ziegler's innovative style, The Faster It Goes testifies to The Railsplitters' multipolar and collaborative songwriting, giving voice to the impressive talents of its members and a cohesive character to the sound.

From the first track, "Tilt-A-Whirl," it's clear the The Faster It Goes is exploring modern speeds: "My mind is like an old Tilt-A-Whirl, it never seems to stop, not even for this girl." With the foot-stomping drive of a reworked traditional tune like, "Salt Salt Sea," or the complex harmony and aggressive rhythms in "It's A Little Late," The Railsplitters are trying to keep up with life, the faster, and faster it goes. While these songs pack an edge and highlight the band's progression into more pop-influenced numbers, The Railsplitters know that life isn't only lived in the fast lane, taking a few moments to unwind with earthy tracks like "The Estuary," which pays tribute to their musical mountain roots, and the album's hidden track, "Sweet Little Miss Blue Eyes."

Though they operate with the instrumentation of a bluegrass band, The Railsplitters are making music totally unlimited by tradition. This is music for the open road, the open dance floor, and open ears--music of the American West, made for all.

-Mindie Lind, Hearth Music
Venue Information:
Cat's Cradle
300 East Main St.
Carrboro, NC, 27510
http://catscradle.com/